Updated: 12/8/2017

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Carrie Baird

Chef Carrie Baird is the executive chef at the popular Bar Dough in Denver. Born in Idaho, but trained in Colorado with classic Mediterranean, Italian and French techniques, Carrie believes great food comes from cooking from your heart. She studied culinary arts at Le Cordon Bleu and cites "Top Chef" alum Jennifer Jasinski (another Denver culinary star) as her greatest mentor.

Q. Why do you choose to live and cook in Colorado?
A: To ski! The mountains!

Q. What defines Colorado's food scene and sets it apart?
A. The diversity in Colorado makes the food scene. There are influences from every part of the world here, making our food scene very unique. Colorado isn't just meat and potatoes.

Top Chef Colorado Cheftestant Carrie Baird
Top Chef Colorado Cheftestant Carrie Baird
Top Chef Colorado Cheftestant Brother Luck
Top Chef Colorado Cheftestant Brother Luck

Q. Any Colorado food trends to watch out for? 
A. Look out, here come the food trucks!

Q. What is your favorite Colorado product to highlight in a dish?
A. I love the peppers that come out of Colorado! Pueblo chile season is the best!

Q. What are your favorite things to do in Colorado in your free time? 
A. Skiing! I also love mountain biking — Fruita is a hidden gem.

Q. What are your Colorado culinary recommendations for visitors?  
A. Señor Bear is doing really cool things. They are definitely pushing the bar here in Denver.

Brother Luck

Chef Brother Luck is the chef/owner of Four by Brother Luck in Colorado Springs, focusing on the four providers behind his cooking — hunters, fisherman, farmer and gatherers. Luck graduated from of The Art Institute of Phoenix and is a Certified Executive Chef through the American Culinary Federation. Luck continued to work in many fine dining kitchens around the world, including the Takitei and Kinjhoro ryokans located in Kanazawa, Japan. His first restaurant, Brother Luck Street Eats, was inspired by street food from around the world.

Q. Why do you choose to live and cook in Colorado?
A. When I first moved to Colorado Springs in 2006, I knew that I had found a special place in the world. The majestic view of Pikes Peak was my introduction into Rocky Mountain living. Cooking in Colorado is amazing because it's still defining its cuisine. I find the growing season more of a challenge to learn about how other cultures have survived this climate in the past. 

Q. What defines Colorado's food scene and sets it apart?
A. I think the people of Colorado's food scene set it apart because so many of us are transplants that became connected to the state through our own stories. The farmers, ranchers and foragers of the state provide such great ingredients that allow us to showcase great drinks and dishes.

Q. Any Colorado food trends to watch out for?
A. I think more chefs are starting to understand indigenous ingredients native to our state and showcasing them for full-season tastings during the height of their harvest: Palisade peaches, Rocky Ford melons, Olathe sweet corn, etc.

Q. What is your favorite Colorado product to highlight in a dish?
A. I love working with Rustic Arugula from Larry Stebbins. It’s spicy, hearty and nutty. He grows it all over the state. 

Q. What are your favorite things to do in Colorado in your free time?
A. In my free time, I like to ride my motorcycle across the state or play golf.  

Q. What are your Colorado culinary recommendations for visitors?
A. Ask a bartender or chef where they eat to find the hidden gems. I think we have some amazing ethnic restaurants in Colorado Springs. I prefer Jamaican and Ethiopian. 

Learn more about "Top Chef" in Colorado >>